Supporting the next generation of athletes

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This week, British Triathlon have been celebrating SportsAid Week to help promote the work of the charity and the athletes they support.

Up-and-coming athletes of all ages from around the country receive financial support, recognition and development opportunities through the work of SportsAid. Many of these athletes would otherwise be fully reliant on the support of their families to meet the costs of training and competing.

Above: Kate Richardson and Libby Coleman are both currently receiving support from SportsAid.

The charity helps athletes from a mix of Olympic and Paralympic sports to develop and fulfil their potential by reducing the financial burden associated with their development. As well as the financial support, receiving SportsAid funding can also provide the motivational boost and encouragement of being recognised as an athlete with potential.

Triathlon England Pathway Manager, Matt Divall, said of the support SportsAid provide athletes developing within the triathlon pathway programmes:

“There are a lot of costs that need to be covered for athletes to make it to the top and, whilst they are still developing in pathway systems, these have to be covered by the athlete and their family.

“Equipment, travel, training and competition costs all add up, so the financial support from SportsAid can help to reduce the pressures and help keep them in the sport.”

SportsAid has helped a variety of triathletes and paratriathletes currently on the World Class Performance Pathway earlier in their careers, with the support having a big impact on their ability to reach where they are now.

Above: Dave Ellis and Sophie Coldwell were previous recipients of SportsAid funding.

On top of the financial support that SportsAid provides, the charity also supports athletes and their families with a variety of opportunities to learn and develop beyond training and competition.

“The support that SportsAid offers to athletes’ families is also really important in helping them to develop,” commented Divall.

“Alongside their coaches, parents and family members are the main support for junior athletes, both financially and emotionally, as well as playing an important part in their development as athletes, with nutritionist, taxi driver and chief cheerleader being just some of the roles they take on.”

You can find out more about SportsAid and the important work they do on their website.

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